Acting doesn’t come much bolder and more blistering than in Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom, George C. Wolfe’s adaptation of August Wilson’s 1982 play about a 1927 Chicago recording session by real-life blues legend Ma Rainey (Viola Davis) and her backing band, comprised of trombonist Cutler (Colman Domingo), bassist Slow Drag (Michael Potts), pianist Toledo (Glynn Turner) and trumpeter Levee (Chadwick Boseman). Stylistically indebted to both the Westerns of Sergio Leone and the thrillers of John Carpenter, and yet imbued with an out-there spirit all its own, Filho and Dornelles’ film takes a gonzo scalpel to geopolitical dynamics. By means of a job coaching his Catholic alma matter’s struggling team, Jack is blessed with a shot at salvation, turning around the fortunes of his players and, by extension, his own life. Director Pietro Marcello’s adaptation of Jack London’s caustic 1909 novel relocates its action from America to Italy (circa the decades between World War I and II) to follow the tumultuous trajectory of Martin Eden (Luca Marinelli), a lowly sailor inspired by his aristocratic paramour Elena (Jessica Cressy) to embark on an autodidactic quest to elevate himself educationally, culturally and politically. Rich in agonized angst and formal flourishes, it’s a masterwork of unhinged tone, as well as a showcase for Buckley, whose grand performance covers an expansive stretch of emotional terrain. Framing characters amidst forest greenery or through constricting cabin windows, and setting its action to the serene sounds of its rural environment – snapping twigs, chirping birds, running water, human breath – it’s an empathetic vision of profound male friendship and perilous capitalist enterprise. Accordingly, it took me a while to get this list whittled down, but I finally did. The film’s formal grandeur – its compositional precision, and painterly interplay of light and dark – is overwhelming, as is the majestic presence of Vitalina herself. Also generating pathos from agonized father-son traumas, it’s a male weepy that, courtesy of its well-calibrated empathy, earns its melodramatic tears.Watch Now. Courtesy of a phenomenal Cohen and Bakalova, Borat and Tutar’s sour-to-sweet relationship provides a sturdy backbone for a series of politicized hidden-camera gags in which the foreigners’ unacceptable behavior coaxes real people to expose themselves as bigots and sexists. Marked by endlessly rotating, fluid hallucinations of birth and decay, it’s a symbolism-rich fantasia that marries the personal and the political in ways that veer from the sweet to the sinister. Fourteen years after becoming a household name, Sacha Baron Cohen’s Khazakstani reporter Borat Sagdiyev returns to mock racist, misogynistic, anti-Semitic Americans in Borat Subsequent Moviefilm, the rare comedy sequel to equal the side-splitting hilarity of its predecessor. No matter that her characters are plagued by malevolent supernatural forces, Natalie Erika James’ directorial debut is a thriller with grimly realistic business on its mind. Secrets, lies and communication breakdowns are all part of this amusingly heartfelt package, which – elevated by expert performances from its cast (in particular, the seething Bergen and affable Hedges) – suggests that in life, as in art, forging dialogues with ourselves, each other and the past is akin to a miracle. It can be a minefield for parents to navigate, and unfortunately, modern culture does not often mix well with this particular time in a boy’s life. Whether you’re looking for the next great memoir, a fascinating historical account, or simply a bit of inspiration to start the year off right, 2020 is shaping up to be a banner year for fans of nonfiction. Aaron Moorhead and Justin Benson are genre filmmakers adept at crafting time-travel stories that double as subtle inquiries into the human condition, and their latest, Synchronic, is their most straightforward and high-profile venture to date. Worse, they’re plagued by specters that live in the walls of their ramshackle new government-issued abode, promising to return the daughter they lost during their treacherous overseas journey if only they’ll make a sacrifice in blood. Nick Schager is a NYC-area film critic and culture writer with twenty years of professional experience writing about all the movies you love, and countless others that you don’t. From our understanding of the beginning of the universe to science’s best conclusions on the very end of time, Greene provides a clear account of how we came to be, our position in the universe, and where we may be headed. This iconic 1933 “autobiography” was written by Gertrude Stein in the voice of her life partner, Alice B. Toklas. His aesthetics as probing as his writing is dexterous, Kaufman overstuffs his material with literary and cinematic shout-outs (and critiques), all while blurring the line between reality and fantasy until such distinctions cease to matter. Bill and Turner Ross’ unique documentary-fiction hybrid depicts the end of the road for The Roaring 20s, a dive bar on the outskirts of the Las Vegas strip where a motley collection of boozehounds come for one final closing-night round of intoxicated camaraderie and revelry. From his earliest days raised by a single mother to his complicated military career and presidency, he did not want his final days spent confronting what may have been the largest sin of his life—his legacy as a slave-owner. Utilizing a variety of disguises to mask his (fictional) identity – because everyone, by now, recognizes him on-sight – Borat reaffirms his status as cinema’s clown prince of pranksterism, culminating with a Rudy Giuliani interview that has to be seen to be believed. Explore the life of intrepid explorer Sanmao, how America rewrote its own history, and Abraham Lincoln’s legacy in the best nonfiction titles of 2020. Marrying the handheld-centric realism of the Dardennes with the unnerving dreaminess of David Lynch, director Nyholm blurs the boundary between fantasy and reality until it vanishes altogether, with the nursery rhyme of the title (sung by Mog) and animated shadow-play sequences both contributing to a wicked storybook atmosphere. Rachel Lance is a biomedical engineer and blast-injury specialist specializing in military diving projects; In the Waves chronicles her three-year obsession with precisely what happened to the Hunley and its crew. Part Cowardly Lion, part Bugs Bunny, and altogether ferocious even as his sanity frays, Hardy’s Capone is yet another triumph for the star, who ultimately captures his protagonist less through imposing physicality than via his dark, glassy, lost eyes. Robert Stone stands as one of the preeminent novelists of postwar American literature. Her work proved a lifeline that would eventually pull the devastated community back together. You Never Forget Your First is an unvarnished look at this nation’s first president that also happens to be mercifully free of the generations of whitewashing that accompany the legend of George Washington. Esquire participates in various affiliate marketing programs, which means we may get paid commissions on editorially chosen products purchased through our links to retailer sites. Gary Smailes - Updated: Aug 13, 2020. In this empathetic portrait of the scars of war, there are profound truths about grief, survival, and the ingrained patterns of our lives. Beginning from her mother’s example, el Kaliouby has broken ground as one of the most visionary minds in the field of artificial intelligence. These are the most anticipated action movies of 2020, with movies featuring Tom Cruise, Ryan Reynolds, Gal Gadot, and more. With the Academy Awards right around the corner, it’s not surprising that many beloved and award-winning movies are based on novels. 1: Hood Feminism: Notes from the Women That a Movement Forgot by. Bio-terror comes in corrupting forms in The Beach House, whose contagion-based scares speak, subtly if severely, to our present moment. The submarine, the HL Hunley, then disappeared without a trace. The director lays out the myriad forces at play in this ostensibly picture-perfect milieu in exacting detail, and his preference for longer takes means that the focus remains squarely on his performers. Pages in category "Fiction set in 2020" The following 18 pages are in this category, out of 18 total. And you can watch them right now. Like Orson Welles’ classic 1938 The War of the Worlds broadcast, the film is a tale of potential invasion that plays out over radio waves, and Patterson thus naturally focuses on intently listening faces, and the spoken words that captivate them, as a means of generating anticipation, mystery and suspense. In 2017, Susan Fowler published the blog post that kicked open the doors on the culture of sexual harassment and retaliation that permeated much of Silicon Valley. Lovecraft are an ideal genre-movie pair, and Color Out of Space ably channels the latter’s gift for unreal terror while providing the former with a vehicle for charmingly out-there antics. Ree reveals such connections through subtle juxtapositions that emerge naturally from his subjects’ day-to-day travails, which eventually involve financial hardships and a near-fatal car crash for Nordland. If I left a "true story" movie off the list it was intentional. Every product was carefully curated by an Esquire editor. As the author of Dog Soldiers and A Flag of Sunrise, Stone proved an extraordinary talent and powerful critic of American influence. This is the story of how one of modern history’s most storied figures held a nation together. In extended scenes of press conferences, presentations, boardroom meetings and community hearings—as well as snapshots of day-to-day life in Beantown’s diverse districts—Wiseman conveys the mundane toil of legislative and regulatory action. In his latest, bestselling author Erik Larson delves into the chaotic first year of Winston Churchill’s first tenure as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. At four-and-a-half hours, the legend’s latest sociological investigation paints a sprawling portrait of the work that goes into maintaining, and improving, a metropolis, especially when said locale is undergoing a significant demographic transformation (55% of Boston is now non-white), and its economic inequality is complicated by a host of racial, gender and class-related issues. Or is it a tool of other sinister forces preparing to strike? At the same time, his centerpiece sequences are models of formal precision and depth, as protracted shots across sprawling fields, through crowded gymnasiums, and in and out of cramped buildings create pulse-pounding tension while simultaneously conveying the propulsive flow and binding, interconnected nature of narrative storytelling itself. It is an irreverent, oft-hilarious, provocative account of the duo’s extraordinary life among Paris’s flourishing expat community, one that included the likes Ernest Hemingway, T.S. Forced to navigate a chauvinistic world that treats them as disposable sexual playthings, denigrates them as whores when they attempt to fulfill that role, and then thwarts their desire for agency – and independence – at every turn, Autumn’s saga is all the more heartbreaking for being so ordinary. Rad American History is a vibrant and powerful view into American history. As with Lover’s Rock (another entry in the filmmaker’s quintet), McQueen imparts a genuine sense of his immigrant milieu. That Buckley’s protagonist is referred to with various names speaks to her fuzzy, fragmented identity, just as the film’s blend of comedy and horror, as well as intricate dialogue and interior narration, speaks to its duality-centric nature. Madness has arrived in infinite-hued form, as Stanley evokes a sense of rifts opening between our world and the great abyss beyond, and delivers fantastical sights of both a CGI and practical-effects sort. In his final screen performance, Boseman matches his co-headliner’s intensity, his Levee so full of vibrant, self-destructive fury, desire and life that it’s a tragedy the performance stands as the late actor’s swan song. 2067 October 2, 2020. With his unprecedented access to Mark Zuckerberg and Sheryl Sandberg, renowned tech journalist Steven Levy has crafted the definitive history of one of the country’s most powerful companies. Oh, he’s a pretty big fan of sci-fi and fantasy as well. No one knows if 2021 will bring us back to theaters or have us continuing to experience new works on our TVs, tablets and phones. Driven to first prove the viability of alternate-current electricity, and then to create a revolutionary wireless energy system that will connect humanity – bringing light, power and resources to the dark corners of the globe – Tesla is an alienated soul embodied with mysterious, self-destructive passion by a superb Hawke. They were a hardworking, upwardly mobile family until a devastating sequence of emotional breakdowns began to rip through their family. It’s an acute snapshot of the American democratic process as filtered through an alternately inspiring and horrifying Lord of the Flies lens. Bag Man serves as an expansion of Rachel Maddow’s Peabody Award-nominated podcast of the same name. Eliot, and Pablo Picasso. Every performance is magnificent, but no one in the cast stands taller than the diminutive Kim, whose turn is irresistibly authentic and charming. Beginning with Kysilkova’s decision to paint Nordland’s portrait (peaking with one of the year’s most stunning scenes), their bond is forged by underlying similarities: traumatic and abusive pasts, as well as their habit of risking their lives for their addictions – in his case, drugs; in hers, painting. A bright spot of this year has been reading more nonfiction books than I normally do. Shot in alternately tremulous and composed handheld, director Balagov’s long takes place a premium on close-ups, the better to convey the dizzying anguish of his subjects, who are as decimated as their environment. While we can’t celebrate them all, this year-long rundown has certainly tried to do justice to the finest that filmmakers had to offer. With this groundbreaking book, Dr. Lisa Mosconi turns the focus to the female brain with a plan to help women attain optimal, lifelong brain health. Tenet September 3, 2020. At the center of his tale is Maxim Lapunov, whose release from a Chechnyan torture chamber—and resultant knowledge of the government’s monstrous activities—turns him into the state’s Enemy Number One. It is only May, and I have read more fabulous nonfiction than I did all of last year. Also fixing its gaze on a one-legged chicken cautiously trudging through tall grass, and a herd of cows whose dark, mysterious eyes gaze intently at the camera, Kossakovsky’s dialogue-free portrait conveys essential truths about survival, togetherness and love through protracted takes that creep around and alongside its four-legged subjects. Yet there are profound depths to director Chloé Zhao’s follow-up to 2018’s The Rider, steeped as her film is in swirling issues of loss and sorrow, discovery and wonder, hardship and survival, and loneliness and togetherness. No matter its conventionality, however, Parkes’ heartfelt performance as Crichlow, a man who wanted to realize a dream and came to understand that he’d created a vital hub for his community, is so enraged and aggrieved that, alongside Letitia Wright’s turn as Altheia Jones, it invigorates this legal affair. Leaning into alternative readings of scripture, Bolz-Weber cuts through societal toxicity and antiquated ideas on sexuality and gender to present an inclusive, gender- and body-positive examination of sex and sexuality. Martin Eden is a superb period piece that also exists out of time and is directly attuned to our perilous present. Dramas don’t come much bleaker than Beanpole, director Kantemir Balagov’s wrenching story about the damage caused by war, and the exceedingly high cost of survival. That’s as arduous a job as Tolontan’s quest to speak truth to power, and the film traces both of their efforts during an election year in which the reforms they seek are threatened by an old guard that wants to return to the crooked past. Kurosawa repeatedly frames Yoko amidst enormous, enveloping crowds, the better to suggest her feelings of isolation and confusion. This delightful 2020 movie arrived just in time to reaffirm there is still some life left in big studio comedies and romantic comedies — especially when there is a healthy dose of action mixed in. Best Non-Fiction/True Story Movies of all Time by labrat70 | created - 15 Feb 2017 | updated - 17 Feb 2017 | Public All are a MUST for your "Bucket List"! In his latest book, renowned physicist Brian Greene takes readers on an exploration of time and humanity’s quest to understand it. Whether you’re looking for the next great memoir, a fascinating historical account, or simply a bit of inspiration to start the year off right, 2020 is shaping up to be a banner year for fans of nonfiction. Splitting his documentary into chapters based on Chatwin’s books, and guiding his action with typically lofty narration, Herzog embarks on the sort of “erratic quest” for answers to existence’s biggest questions that were favored by Chatwin. Sudanese refugees Bol (Sope Dirisu) and Rial (Wunmi Mosaku) successfully make it to England, only to discover that they’ve been followed by relentless ghosts, in His House, a complex horrorshow of guilt, grief and regret. Marder evokes Ruben’s condition through an expertly calibrated soundscape that vacillates between harmonious, crystal-clear atmospherics and the low, scary dullness that now besets Ruben. It’s what Schwartz describes as virtual velvet rope, and its existence impacts the lives of everyday citizens in ways that are proving catastrophic if left unchecked. In February of 1864, the Confederate Army launched the world’s first successful submarine attack on a Union ship. No amount of adult counter-programming can affect the kid, and when he attacks a female teacher (Myriem Akheddiou) for her modernist Islamic teachings, he winds up in a juvenile detention center and, then, at a farm where the affections of Louise (Victoria Bluck) complicate his worldview. Using cheery smiles and go-getter glares to conceal profound depths of resentment, ambition and greed, Hugh Jackman gives the performance of his career as Roslyn, Long Island public school superintendent Dr. Frank Tassone in Bad Education. Whether being chastised by her boss (who’s only heard in hushed phone calls), or sharing quiet, pointed glances with her female colleagues, Jane is a victim of both exploitative men and, just as severely, a corrupt institutional structure that perpetuates itself by fostering cutthroat ruthlessness and alienating silence. A cry for help and a call to arms, it’s nothing short of straight-up horrifying. Led by the heroic Judy Heumann and many of her fellow Jened alums, a civil rights movement was born, resulting in the famous San Francisco sit-in to compel U.S. Secretary of Health, Education and Wellness Joseph Califano to sign Section 504 of 1973’s Rehabilitation Act, and later, the ADA. Tenet may be the ultimate Christopher Nolan movie, distilling the director’s aesthetic style, storytelling conventions and thematic preoccupations down to their abstract essence. Here are the best non-fiction books, including celebrity memoirs, investigations into the royal family, and more, to publish in 2020. Or try any of these new books that our editors recommend . Beset by hunger, the two come upon the home of a witch (Alice Krige), whose feasts are as mouth-watering as her magic lessons for Gretel are simultaneously empowering and unnerving. Directors Jesse Moss and Amanda McBaine’s documentary follows a number of kids as they make their way through Texas’ week-long Boys State program (sponsored by the American Legion), in which hundreds of teenagers are split into two political parties (Federalists and Nationalists) and asked to create a unified platform and elect officials. At Read It Forward, we have a healthy obsession with authors, stories, and the readers who love them. This biography by Madison Smartt Bell—himself an acclaimed novelist and also a close confidant of Stone—is the definitive accounting of Robert Stone’s storied life and career. From tales of true crime to riveting memoirs of astounding lives, this list features 12 of our favorite compelling nonfiction works that have inspired some truly great movies. Its studied imagery suggesting a daintier variation on Wes Anderson’s trademark visuals, Emma boasts an aesthetic confidence that’s matched by its performers. Unifying its scenes of public service via flowing transitional montages of city streets, and routinely featuring committed and candid Mayor Marty Walsh as its nominal “protagonist,” his doc pays tribute to the act of listening, and engaging in constructive conversation, as a vehicle for progress. There may be no more suspenseful moment in cinema this year than the sight of David running after Soon-ja – nor one more affecting. recounts Mari Gilbert’s (Amy Ryan) efforts to find her oldest daughter Shannan, public school superintendent Dr. Frank Tassone in, make their way through Texas’ week-long Boys State program, comprised of trombonist Cutler (Colman Domingo), a fictionalized account of the last year in the life of the legendary American gangster, Writer/director Josh Trank’s film is a subjective affair, references to notable (but largely forgotten) African-American trailblazers, his stowaway 15-year-old daughter Tutar (Maria Bakalova), making coherent heads or tails of the film’s convoluted story about, The Best Upcoming New Superhero Movies in 2020, The Best, Must-Watch TV Shows Coming Out in 2020, The 15 Most Anticipated Video Games of 2020, The Most Anticipated Movies of 2020 That Are Based on Books, Our Favorite Netflix Original Movies Released in 2020. We are experiencing an error, please try again. Her experiences as an entry-level engineer at Uber set off a firestorm that would eventually lead to the ousting of Uber’s CEO and multiple other employees. The ever-widening gap between America’s wealthiest and, well, everyone else is a well-documented and dire aspect of American life. Alexander Nanau’s bracing and vital documentary concerns the fallout from the October 30, 2015 fire at the Colectiv nightclub in Bucharest, Romania that resulted in 27 immediate deaths, and the resignation of the ruling Social Democratic administration. Over the course of one sloshed 24-hour period, Bloody Nose, Empty Pockets evokes a pitch-perfect sense of its going-to-seed milieu and equally haggard visitors, with former actor-turned-floor sweeper Michael proving the weary epicenter of its laid-back action. daughter. Good luck making coherent heads or tails of the film’s convoluted story about a CIA agent known only as the Protagonist (John David Washington) who teams with a shadowy colleague (Robert Pattinson) to discover the origins of bullets that, thanks to entropic “inversion,” can travel back in time. "Non-Fiction" is definitely a talking movie with, maybe, 3 minutes of silence, no dialogue! Putting a poignant face on a contentious social topic, Never Rarely Sometimes Always tells the story of pregnant Pennsylvania 17-year-old Autumn (Sidney Flanigan), who with her loyal cousin Skylar (Talia Ryder) by her side, travels to New York to procure an abortion. The Act of Killing (2012) Joshua Oppenheimer's elegantly disturbing investigation into the determinedly suppressed legacy of Indonesia's 1965-66 mass killings has been discussed at length here and elsewhere. From vast sights of the snow-capped Andes, to grainy on-the-street video footage of Pinochet tyranny, to introspective interviews with fellow artists, Guzmán’s film (the third entry in a trilogy that also includes Nostalgia for the Light and The Pearl Button) examines the catastrophic upheaval of 1973’s coup d’état, and the lingering scars it left on him and the country’s citizens. Though you won’t hear Harvey Weinstein’s name uttered once, his presence is palpable throughout this clinical story about Jane (a sterling Julia Garner), whose position as the low woman on the totem pole at a film production company necessitates enduring mistreatment of both a subtle and overt sort. Yet there are no shortage of brilliant women pushing the boundaries of knowledge and making pioneering advancements across any number of fields. The Women with Silver Wings tells the extraordinary story of the first female aviators in US Air Force History: the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP). Despair, desire, and madness are all entangled in Josephine Decker’s Shirley, about the late horror writer Shirley Jackson’s (Elisabeth Moss) attempt to pen her sophomore novel Hangsaman while dealing with her unfaithful critic/professor husband Stanley Edgar Hyman (Michael Stuhlbarg) as well as two boarders, aspiring academic Fred (Logan Lerman) and his pregnant wife Rose (Odessa Young).

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